Sunday, 8 December 2019

Blog Post - 8 December 2019: Toronto Textures, Part 2

A follow-up to last week’s photos.

What delights me most about this series of photos is the variety colours, even the grey tone images. On a spectacularly beautiful late autumn day in the city, all of these images leapt out at me and yelled, “Me! Me! Photograph me!” And I was happy to oblige.

One of the most engaging aspects photography for me is how it integrates my eyesight with my camera. The camera almost becomes a surrogate for my eyes – a parallel and complementary way of seeing. The camera strengthens the discernment of my eyes – my eyes see more when I have my camera; my camera performs better when it follows the lead of my eyes. It’s almost a symbiotic relationship. Long may it be.

I hope you enjoy these urban images. Next week, I’ll dive into the joys of nighttime Santa Claus parades!

































Sunday, 1 December 2019

Blog Post - 1 December 2019: Toronto Textures, Part 1

A change of pace from last week’s photos.

Regular readers of this blog already know that I love photographing Toronto. I find it an exuberant source of photographic inspiration and delight. Last week, I took advantage of a clear day on the calendar – and delightfully warm, sunny weather – to take the train to Toronto for a day of walking and photography. Instead of photographing people, which is often my preoccupation in Toronto, I explored the city’s textures and shapes. 

From Union Station, I walked up Spadina Avenue through Chinatown to the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Architecture, just north of College Street. Then I wandered through the UofT campus, visited the Gardiner Ceramic Museum, and checked out the competitive high-end shopping in Yorkville. The walking tour then looped down Bay Street to the Eaton Centre, then back to Union Station in the early evening to catch my train home – six hours and 24,129 steps later. What a feast for the eyes! I’m grateful for sturdy walking shoes and dependable feet. My knees, however, took a few days to recover. 

This week and next, I’ll feature photos from these Toronto wanderings.

A few words about my fascination with abstracts and textures: this form of photography usually doesn’t require a knowledge of the photograph’s context to be appreciated. The images could come from virtually any urban North American environment. They are, nonetheless, downtown Toronto moments recorded on my leisurely stroll. The city clashed and clanged around me while I remained calm, simply recording what I saw. Such a privilege. Thank you, Toronto – once again, you have rewarded me with your quirky beauty and peculiarity. 

I hope you enjoy the photos.

Backpack, Queen's Park Crescent

Community Bulletin Board, Spadina Avenue

Chinatown Beans

EveryOne (2018), by Cannupa Hanska Luger
After the photograph Sister (2016) by Kali Spitzer
In Memory of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women 
in North America
Gardiner Museum, Toronto

Queen's Park Bench

Outside the Gardiner Museum

Louis Vuitton Window Display, Yorkville

Louis Vuitton Window Display, Yorkville

Louis Vuitton Window Display, Yorkville

Sheldon & Tracy Levy Student Learning Centre,
Ryerson University

John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto:
NEW CIRCADIA (adventures in mental spelunking).
Curated by Professor Richard Sommer and New York-based designers Pillow Culture.

John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto

John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, University of Toronto

Window Display, Yorkville